Booksellers’ Choice Book of the Year

The Australian Booksellers Association (ABA) has announced the shortlists for the 2022 Booksellers’ Choice Book of the Year Awards. The Booksellers’ Choice Book of the Year Awards recognise the Australian books that booksellers most enjoyed reading and hand-selling during the previous year. The winners will be announced on Sunday, 12 June at the ABA conference gala dinner and awards night in Sydney.

Can you predict the winner(s) before then?

Aurealis Awards 2022

The Aurealis Awards were established in 1995 by Chimaera Publications, the publishers of Aurealis magazine, to recognise the achievements of Australian science fiction, fantasy and horror writers. The awards originally comprised four categories: science fiction, fantasy, horror, and young adult. A fifth category for children’s fiction was added in 2001. The YA and children’s categories cover works in all three speculative fiction genres. The list of finalists and winners have increased the profile of Australian science fiction, fantasy, and horror, and provide an essential reading list for anyone interested in these genres.

The 2022 Shortlist titles are below, the winners for each category will be announced on Saturday 28 May. Why not borrow and read one or more before the award ceremony and see if you can pick the winner(s)!

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NSW Premier’s Literary Awards Shortlist

UPDATE – Winners have been announced!
Book of the Year & Multicultural NSW award – Still alive – Safdar Ahmed with other winners below.
People’s Choice winner –The shut ins – Katherine Brabon.

The NSW Premier’s Literary Awards are held annually. They are the richest and longest running state-based literary awards in Australia and cover all genres of writing. The shortlisted titles for the 2022 Awards have been released with the winners being announced on 16 May during the Sydney Writers’ Festival.

People’s Choice Award – Select your favourite from the books shortlisted for the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction to enter the draw to win one of two prize packs of all six books. Click on the image above or here to enter the competition. Voting closes Sunday 1st May.

Christina Stead Prize for Fiction – Shortlist

The award may be made for a novel or a collection of stories. Works of creative non-fiction, including fictionalised memoirs, are eligible for consideration under this category. The award commemorates Christina Ellen Stead (1902–1983), Australian novelist and short story writer.

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Stella Prize 2022 Longlist

The Stella Prize is a major literary award celebrating Australian women’s writing. The $50,000 prize is awarded annually to one outstanding book deemed to be original, excellent, and engaging. Announcing the 12 exceptional books by Australian women and non-binary writers in the running for the tenth annual Stella Prize. The 2022 Stella Prize longlist includes novels, short fiction, memoir, social history, a book-length essay, a graphic novel, and – eligible for the first time in 2022 – poetry collections. Why not reserve one or more now and see if you can pick the winner before is announced Thursday 28 April.

Book Review An Isolated Incident

An Isolated Incident by Emily Maguire

Summary

When 25-year-old Bella Michaels is brutally murdered in the small town of Strathdee, the community is stunned and a media storm descends.

Unwillingly thrust into the eye of that storm is Bella’s beloved older sister, Chris, a barmaid at the local pub, whose apparent easygoing nature conceals hard-won wisdom and the kind of street-smarts only experience can bring.

As Chris is plunged into despair and searches for answers, reasons, explanation – anything – that could make even the smallest sense of Bella’s death, her ex-husband, friends and neighbours do their best to support her. But as the days tick by with no arrest, Chris’s suspicion of those around her grows.

Comments

This book was not quite the psychological thriller we thought it was. It was more about the friends and family left behind after a loved one is murdered, violently. The love/hate relationship they have with the media. While we understand what the book was trying to get across, we felt it didn’t quite hit the mark. For the most part, the book was well written, and engaging despite the grim subject. The main characters we are little hard to connect with.  We sympathised with Chris, and felt her pain, but some of her actions were questionable.  We found ourselves reading to the end, wanting to know who did it, why they did it, and how many managed to get the victim in their own car in such a public space without being noticed.  

Rating 7.5/10