Book Review – Jessica

Jessica by Bryce Courtenay

ABOUT THE BOOK

Jessica is based on the inspiring true story of a young girl’s fight for justice against tremendous odds.

A tomboy, Jessica is the pride of her father, as they work together on the struggling family farm. One quiet day, the peace of the bush is devastated by a terrible murder. Only Jessica is able to save the killer from the lynch mob – but will justice prevail in the courts?

Nine months later, a baby is born … with Jessica determined to guard the secret of the father’s identity. The rivalry of Jessica and her beautiful sister for the love of the same man will echo throughout their lives – until finally the truth must be told.

Set in the harsh Australian bush against the outbreak of World War I, this novel is heartbreaking in its innocence, and shattering in its brutality.

‘A deserved bestseller, based on fact, a story told with heartbreaking honesty.’ Australian Women’s Weekly

‘Courtenay draws on the social satire of Jane Austen and the dark forces of Thomas Hardy, and his tragic heroine parallels Antigone … ‘ Herald Sun

COMMENTS

Bryce Courtney’s book Jessica is an enthralling read about life in the outback early 1900’s Australia.  The hardship and expectations of everyone around her just made her more determined to go her own way in life.  That is until wrongly committed to the asylum.  Friendship and love prevail.  It’s a beautifully written book set in sheep country with vivid descriptions of life and death on a station.  However there were those who found it implausible and disappointing.

READ BY

MJ Readers Club 7/10

Parra Pods, Identity

Episode 24 – Identity

Mass human migration in modern history has made identity such an interesting and complex thing, at least we think so!

In this episode join Katherine and Nisa as they discuss two Australian books that focus on ‘Identity’, with a sideways dip into the ‘On’ series of books published by Melbourne University Press.

Some of the books discussed include:

On Identity by Stan Grant, Melbourne University Press, May 2019.

Arab, Australian, Other: Stories on Race and Identity – Randa Abdel-Fattah and Sarah Saleh (eds), Picador, May 2019.

On Freedom by Tory Shepherd, Melbourne University Press, June 2019.

On Artists by Ashleigh Wilson, Melbourne University Press, May 2019.

HAPPY LISTENING!

Nisa & Katherine

Book Review – Big Little Lies

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

ABOUT THE BOOK

A murder… A tragic accident… Or just parents behaving badly? What is indisputable is that someone is dead.

Big Little Lies will take you on a roller coaster ride with the secrets of the three women.  

Madeline is a force to be reckoned with. She is funny, biting, and passionate; she remembers everything and forgives no one. Celeste is the kind of beautiful woman who makes the world stop and stare but she is paying a price for the illusion of perfection. New to town, single mum Jane is so young that another mother mistakes her for a nanny. She comes with a mysterious past and a sadness beyond her years. These three women are at different crossroads, but they will all wind up in the same shocking place.

Big Little Lies is a brilliant take on ex-husbands and second wives, mothers and daughters, schoolyard scandal, and the little lies that can turn lethal.

Continue reading

Out of the Box – October 2019

A small snapshot of a selection of new titles that arrived in October.

Happy Reading!

NON FICTION

FOR THE KIDS

Look What I See by Judi Barrett (Board Book)

Window of Hope by Robert Vescio (Picture Book)

Sleep, My Bunny by Rosemary Wells (Picture Book)

Colours, Chatterbox Baby (Picture Book)

Spots and Dots: First Patterns Playbook (Board Book)

Vognox the Viking and the Island of Skeletons by Nick Falk (EJ FALK)

Cloud Boy by Marcia Williams (Junior Fiction)

YOUNG ADULT